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20130203
20130203
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
world. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org.
because of the legal journey. khalid el-masri also had cases here in the united states. and the u.s. courts actually refused to look into the merits of those claims, looking at things like the state secrets privilege or different types of immunities that would keep him as a torture victim from being vindicated in u.s. courts. so in fact what i think is the lesson here is not so much that the european courts could make those findings. it's that the european court did make those findings. >> you mean he couldn't have gotten a fair trial or the courts wouldn't at least give him a trial in this country? >> in this country, very few of the post-9/11 torture victims have ever had their day in court. and in fact, until recently the center for constitutional rights has been successful in a settlement. we got $5.2 million from u.s. corporations who were involved in harsh interrogation and torture in abu ghraib for 72 torture victims. but none of those cases have gone through adjudications. no court has made a finding the way that the european court did about the circumstances of their tortur
will discuss what he thought the u.s. could have done -- stanley mcchrystal and discussed what he thought the u.s. could have done better. the retired four-star general commanded special operations in iraq and all u.s. forces in afghanistan and his resignation in 2010. this event is about 90 minutes. terrorist zarqawi, but also many of the procedures that led to the finding and killing of bin laden. the success of joint special operations command is one of the most important stories in the broader war on terror. we are honored that roos will be -- bruce riedel will be interviewing general mcchrystal this morning. this is based on the recent book, which i hope you a purchase, which we are proud to be discussing, my share of the task -- "my share of the task," its describes the role of not only command, but also other military personnel and international personnel that he worked with. just a couple more words about our panelists. bruce was a 30-year cia veteran before joining brookings in 2006. at the cia, he did a number of things, including working at nato headquarters. he was an advisor to four
this week. here is the a.p. headline. u.s. limited in fight against north african militants. the united states is struggling to confront an uptick in threats in the newest hot spot with limited intelligence and few partners to help as the obama administration weighs who you to keep islamic extremists from jeopardizing national security without launching war. we want to put up a map here. and explain to people where this is. egypt, libya, algeria, mali, niger. when i read about the idea that we don't have enough intelligence, we've known about al qaeda in north africa since before 9/11. this is the original safe haven of osama bin laden, was north africa. did we drop the ball? >> you know, when al qaeda attacked the united states on 9/11, and it became clear that we had to go to war on terrorism against al qaeda, we focused on al qaeda's core leadership and where they were at. and we've done that. we've gone after them in pakistan, afghanistan, and going after them in yemen, going after them in somalia. yes, they are out there. >> it's been out there a long time, right? it's not new. >>
. i went to the german embassy in 2007. the ambassador had all of the ambassadors to the u.s. i said let's talk about detention and interrogation. i laid it out. let me give you four sentences. we believe we are a nation at war with al qaeda and the affiliates. my moral and legal responsibility is to take it to that enemy. there's not another country in the room who agreed with any of those four sentences. they not only rejected it for them, they had serious questions about the legitimacy of the questions for us. sometimes you have to forgo things that in your mind are ethical, legal, and effective because secondary and tertiary effects of taking that course of action may make you less effective. let's take target of killing. i said on cnn sunday morning, there was a time -- i knew there were secondary effects was the primary effect was so important because of the degree of danger that existed at the time. now the environment as changed the degree is somewhat different. now those effects might become dominant. yes, i can see a down side for doing things that you believe are effective
life. i have been david and i have raised two children here. i have been a u.s. attorney for this area, and starting last month one of the hoosier state voices in the us house of representatives. i am proud to live in a state that spends less than it takes in, has a aaa credit rating and a budget surplus that will be partially repay to taxpayers areas the secret to our state success has been a value system that promotes a strong sense of responsibility and accountability. as family members, taxpayers, and community volunteers. for too long, the democratic majority in washington has failed to see the value in the sound model of working hard and living within your means. on their watch, we have been operating without a national budget. piling up debts that now exceed $60 trillion, and unemployment levels that remain stubbornly high. we are again at risk at having our credit rating downgraded. the spite these challenges, americans concerned about our nation spending problem may now have cause for optimism. i recent be voted along with my colleagues in the house for a simple but powerful c
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)